A good dynamic warm-up should not only prepare an athlete for their workout, practice, game, or competition, but with consistent use it should also help prevent injuries and enhance performance. Multiple studies have shown that the implementation of a 15-20 minute dynamic warm-up performed at the beginning of games and practices can help to reduce injuries such as ACL tears, muscle pulls, tendon strains, and other non-contact injuries. The research states that an effective dynamic warm-up should include stretching, agilities, plyometrics, strengthening, and neuromuscular training. Plyometric training, however, has been shown to be one of the most effective tools in reducing non-contact ACL injuries.

One mistake I commonly see made is that coaches and trainers often allow the players to simply perform the warm-up without giving any feedback on correct technique of the movements. If the movements are not performed correctly, and we allow the athletes to use inefficient movement strategies, then we are perpetuating these “bad habits” and are not going to help the athletes to reduce their risk of injury. As with the training of a new move or technical skill, the correct technique must be coached and practiced in order for the more efficient movement pattern to become second nature. Therefore, when the athlete is in a game situation and needs to perform a cutting maneuver, their bodies have been trained to do so in an energy efficient and biomechanically correct way which thereby reduces the risk of of utilizing a movement pattern that might put them at risk for injury.

Jog – Have the athlete jog down and back, making sure they are utilizing proper arm swing. I often give the cue “chin to pocket” to help the athletes visualize where to bring their hands. I also often see athletes utilize “wood-chopping” arms in which they straighten and bend the elbow rather than swinging from the shoulder. Pointing this out to them and telling them to keep their elbows bent and swing back from the shoulder also helps this. For additional info https://inthegamept.wordpress.com/

Please contact a SportsCare Physical Therapy location to schedule an appointment.We look forward to meeting you.

Page Link – https://sportscare1.com/services/physical-therapy/sports-injuries/

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Sports Injuries

Preventing Sports Injuries
A good dynamic warm-up should not only prepare an athlete for their workout, practice, game, or competition, but with consistent use it should also help prevent injuries and enhance performance. Multiple studies have shown that the implementation of a 15-20 minute dynamic warm-up performed at the beginning of games and practices can help to reduce injuries such as ACL tears, muscle pulls, tendon strains, and other non-contact injuries. The research states that an effective dynamic warm-up should include stretching, agilities, plyometrics, strengthening, and neuromuscular training. Plyometric training, however, has been shown to be one of the most effective tools in reducing non-contact ACL injuries.

One mistake I commonly see made is that coaches and trainers often allow the players to simply perform the warm-up without giving any feedback on correct technique of the movements. If the movements are not performed correctly, and we allow the athletes to use inefficient movement strategies, then we are perpetuating these “bad habits” and are not going to help the athletes to reduce their risk of injury. As with the training of a new move or technical skill, the correct technique must be coached and practiced in order for the more efficient movement pattern to become second nature. Therefore, when the athlete is in a game situation and needs to perform a cutting maneuver, their bodies have been trained to do so in an energy efficient and biomechanically correct way which thereby reduces the risk of of utilizing a movement pattern that might put them at risk for injury.

Jog – Have the athlete jog down and back, making sure they are utilizing proper arm swing. I often give the cue “chin to pocket” to help the athletes visualize where to bring their hands. I also often see athletes utilize “wood-chopping” arms in which they straighten and bend the elbow rather than swinging from the shoulder. Pointing this out to them and telling them to keep their elbows bent and swing back from the shoulder also helps this. For additional info https://inthegamept.wordpress.com/

Please contact a SportsCare Physical Therapy location to schedule an appointment.We look forward to meeting you.

Page Link – https://sportscare1.com/services/physical-therapy/sports-injuries/

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